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After Labor Day

Monday, September 1st, 2014

You might have had a hamburger or hot dog for Labor Day, or even an ice cream. Well, here’s an ESPN story about a baseball player who did not appreciate his ice cream.

Jesus Montero was considered to be a “can’t miss” prospect in the New York Yankees farm system. He was then sent to the Seattle Mariners in a deal that was expected to begin a long major league career in Seattle. Unfortunately for Montero, that has not developed.

The Seattle organization has been losing patience in Montero’s effort. They have changed his position from catcher to first base, to designated hitter. They have brought him to the majors, put him in the minors; and he is now all the way down in Class A. This occurred after he returned from a 50-game-suspension relating to his positive testing for a banned performance- enhancing drug(s).

The Mariners put him all the way in Single A because they have questioned his baseball preparation, and that he showed up for spring training almost 40 pounds overweight. Now to the ice cream.

Apparently, one of the Seattle organizational scouts was at a recent Montero baseball game. Reportedly, the player did not hustle out a ground ball to first base; Exactly what they have been saying about his effort. In response, the scout sent an ice cream sandwich down to Montero. He was trying to make a point. He did. Montero didn’t like it.

Montero left the dugout, armed with a baseball… and the ice cream sandwich. He charged the scout in the stands and hurled the sandwich at the scout. Before getting there with his bat, he was restrained by other players.

Should we say that the moral of the story is that it is better to send an ice cream sundae instead of a sandwich? Or, some gifts are just not well received! If you did have an ice cream yesterday, I hope that you did enjoy it. It really is not good for throwing.

 

And for pic o’ day we have Carl the cat giving himself a pep talk:

car the cat

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Charles Whittlesey: What Happened?

Wednesday, August 27th, 2014

     Wednesday’s Our Daily Bread , with a look toward Labor Day, briefly recited the story of Charles Whittlesey.

      Whittle

      Whittlesey initially graduated from law school and joined a law firm partnership. However, he felt a duty to join the military when the United States entered World War I. He left his partnership and shipped to France as a captain.

     At one point, he and his battalion were behind enemy lines as he commanded 554 soldiers. They were cut off from supplies. At one point, his unit was dubbed the “Lost Battalion” because all contact with the U.S. Army had been lost.

     On October 7, 1918, the Germans sent a blindfolded American prisoner of war carrying a white flag toward the battalion. He was carrying a letter that said the following:

 ”The suffering of your wounded men can be heard over here in the German lines, and we are appealing to your humane sentiments to stop. A white flag shown by one of your men will tell us that you agree with these conditions. Please treat Private Lowell R. Hollingshead [the bearer] as an honorable man. He is quite a soldier. We envy you. The German commanding officer.”

     Whittlesey would not allow his men to surrender. Instead, he ordered that the white sheets that had been placed as signals to the Allied troops be removed, just in case the Germans would think that they were surrendering. That night, a relief force arrived and rescued the Battalion. Whittlesey received a battlefield promotion to lieutenant-colonel and ultimately received three medals of honor.

     He was considered a war hero of heroes. .

     His Wikipedia story summarizes the ending of his life with the following:

In November 1921, Whittlesey acted as a pallbearer at the burial of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery, along with fellow Medal of Honor recipients Samuel Woodfill and Alvin York. A few days later he booked passage from New York to Havana aboard the SS Toloa, a United Fruit Company ship. On November 26, 1921, the first night out of New York, he dined with the captain and left the smoking room at 11:15 p.m. stating he was retiring for the evening, and it was noted by the captain that he was in good spirits. Whittlesey was never seen again. He was reported missing at 8:00 a.m. the following morning. He is presumed to have committed suicide by jumping overboard, although no one reported seeing him jump and Whittlesey’s body was never recovered. Before leaving New York, he prepared a will leaving his property to his mother. He also left a series of letters in his cabin addressed to relatives and friends. The letters were addressed to his parents, his brothers Elisha and Melzar, his uncle Granville Whittlesey, and to his friends George McMurtry, J. Bayard Pruyn, Robert Forsyth Little and Herman Livingston, Jr. Also in his cabin was found a note to the captain of the Toloa leaving instructions for the disposition of the baggage left in his stateroom. He left the famous German letter asking for surrender to McMurtry.

     This life story of this hero is fitting as a remembrance, as we head into Labor Day. As Our Daily Bread referenced, Charles Whittlesey was publicly strong. Because he took his life, inwardly he must have been dealing with such emotions of despair.

     Maybe it’s a good reminder to us that just because someone says that everything is great, doesn’t mean that ”everything is great”. That they sure could use a word of encouragement. Also, that those returning from the battlefield many times need more than a welcome home.     

 

     I hope you have a great weekend. Back on Tuesday. 

     And for pic o’ day, I felt the need to go a bit on the light side… in changing places:

changing places

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Photo Traffic Tickets Dismissed

Tuesday, August 26th, 2014

Thousands of drivers in New Jersey can breathe a traffic ticket sigh of relief. (NJ.com) The state Judiciary has asked local courts to dismiss tickets that were issued to  17,000 drivers who were caught on camera running red lights.

photo light

Under New Jersey law, drivers are supposed to receive notice within 90 days that they have been charged with the traffic violation of running a red light. That notice did not go out to the drivers. The company that has oversight for failing to send the notices is also under scrutiny as to whether they paid bribes and gave gifts to government officials, to  help secure these traffic camera contracts.

Ultimately, I suspect that losing the revenue from 17,000 traffic tickets has caused this attention. Isn’t it interesting that this would arise in New Jersey, the home of ”Bridgegate” and Governor Christie?

DID YOU KNOW that Napoleon was afraid of cats? History tells us that Napoleon apparently had a wild cat jump on him while he was still in the crib as a baby, and he never recovered.

And with that thought… our  pic o’ day :

see no evil

 

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Jesse Steinfeld’s Impact

Monday, August 25th, 2014

If I said the name Jesse Steinfield to you, would you ask me if that’s the lady with a recipe book… who is married to Jerry? Well, no. That’s Jessica Seinfeld… married to Jerry Seinfeld.

When I saw the obituary for Jesse Steinfeld, I thought his name sounded familiar… but not really. So, I decided to do my own research. What captured my attention in the obituary?

Steinfeld was the Surgeon General under President Nixon from 1969-1973.  According to his Wikipedia entry, he resigned at the beginning of the beginning of the second term of the Nixon Presidency. That was the official story. In fact, he was forced out of his appointment after campaigning against the harms of smoking.

Before his “resignation”, he is credited with changing the cigarette package labels to include a warning that clearly stated that smoking was hazardous to your health. He also called on a smoking ban in restaurants, theaters, planes and public places. Unfortunately, it took several years for those changes to become reality.

Dr. Steinfeld was on a mission to take on Big Tobacco. To that end, he issued a report that focused on the dangers of second-hand smoke. Unfortunately, at that time, the tobacco lobby was powerful enough to seek his removal from office.

Steinfeld may have been forced out of Washington, but he continued to impact tobacco through medicine. He later served as Director of the Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Cancer Center and as a Professor at the Mayo Medical School. Steinfeld became President of the Medical College of Georgia, a position he held until his retirement. I’d say that Big Tobacco won the battle and Steinfeld won his war!

DID YOU KNOW that telephone companies first began to hire teenage boys as their operators? They then switched to adult women because the boys were constantly wrestling instead of working, and pulling pranks on the callers.

And our pic o’ day:

fold

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The Dinosaur Threat

Monday, August 25th, 2014

Here’s a new blog topic for me. From Summerville, South Carolina, comes the news story of sixteen-year-old Alex Stone. According to WCSC TV (CBS-5), Stone was arrested by the Summerville Police, with a charge of disorderly conduct.

Stone’s arrest came about after he and his classmates were given the creative assignment of writing about themselves with a few sentences about their “status” on their Facebook account. So, Stone wrote a fictional story that included the words “gun” and “take care of business”. In this instance, he was writing a story about killing his dinosaur.

After writing about his pet dinosaur, Stone was also suspended from school. School officials claim that after Stone was arrested and placed in handcuffs, that he became very disruptive. This contributed to his ultimate school suspension and disorderly conduct charge.

As part of the incident report, after the word “gun” popped up, the administration searched his locker and book bag. I know what you are thinking… no dinosaur either. Does this stand for the premise that guns don’t kill dinosaurs,  flying pterodactyls do? The school system claims that there will be zero tolerance regarding guns.

DID YOU KNOW that in 1846, a New York Knickerbocker professional baseball player was fined 6 cents for swearing at the umpire?

And our pic o’ day:

new owners

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Some Communication

Thursday, August 21st, 2014

During the Civil War, it was not unusual for newspaper reporters to cover the war by sending stories back to be published, while at the same time bringing news from home to the soldiers. A good form of communication.  Here’s a form of bad wartime communication as described by attorney Paul Luvera.

     President Franklin Roosevelt sent ambassador Winant to meet with Russia’s Molotov during World War II. In presenting Roosevelt’s message he opened with a few words of his own. He said he was going to “talk turkey on this issue.” Molotov interrupted with: “Turkey? What does Turkey have to do with the Baltic states?” The ambassador tried to explain patiently that “talking turkey” was merely an American expression meaning to talk seriously, but the suspicious Molotov could not or would not understand, and the meeting ended without any useful discussion of the presidents message. The ambassador never regained Roosevelt’s confidence after that.

     In our work as lawyers, I have heard the following simple communication rules:

Be calm; Be slow; Be nice.

Pretty good reminders for life. I hope you have a great weekend!

 

Napolean

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101 and Still Working!

Wednesday, August 20th, 2014

Here’s a story of sticking with it. (NorthJersey.com) Herman “Hy” Goldman just turned 101 over the weekend. That’s pretty amazing.

herman-hy-goldman     More amazing is that he has worked at his same New Jersey job for the past 73 years. And, he continues to drive himself to work in his 1999 Ford Contour.

Hy Goldman now works four days a week. He specializes in rebuilding items that were damaged or unusable at Capitol Lighting. Except for his brief absence from work to serve in the U.S. Army during World War II, Goldman has worked at this same light fixture company during his entire work life. The store initially hired him to sell items and stock and clean the displays.

 

DID YOU KNOW that Ivory Soap was originally named P&G White Soap? Thereafter, Harley Proctor was in church, reading the 45th Psalm and read the verse, “All thy garments smell of myrrh, and aloes, and cassia, out of ivory palaces, whereby they have made thee glad.”. New name!

kitty

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Cards and Numbers

Tuesday, August 19th, 2014

One insurance company advertises that in 15 minutes you can save 15% or more on your car insurance. Another company named Esurance has decided to combat that kind of claim. Their ads say that getting a quote takes only 7 1/2 minutes to get a quote. Neither advertises how fast that they pay a claim. Here’s some more useless statistics that may only fascinate me:

There are 52 cards in a standard deck of cards. There are 52 weeks in a year. There are 4 different suits (hearts, diamonds, spades, clubs). There are 4 seasons in a year. If you add the values of all cards in a deck,  with the numerical assignments of jack equals 11, queen equals 12, King equals 13 etc., you get a total of 365. Yep, the same as the number of days in a year. And a picture is worth a thousand words? Or how about that the average McDonald’s Big Mac has an average of 198 sesame seeds on its buns. I think about as useful as getting a fast quote.

DID YOU KNOW that 7.5 million tooth picks can be made from one cord of wood? Now that’s not useless!

And for pic o’ day, here’s more online fast stuff!

credit

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Just Some Truth

Monday, August 18th, 2014

I cannot hide this site from you. Every now and then it has some funny “truth” pictures. The site is kindofnormal.com.

For the blog, here are some of their samples of truth. First, living without:

Live without

Second, is their “biggest lies on the Internet”:

lies

And finally, How about some grocery truth?

grocery

 

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Some Colts History Because!

Sunday, August 17th, 2014

Yesterday was my birthday. So, I almost didn’t write the blog. Then, I decided to go a different direction.

Let me warn you. The following is long. It’s a story of why the Baltimore Colts moved to Indianapolis and what happens when there is a threat of eminent domain. For Baltimore, it was crushing. So much so that the mayor cried.

Today, Baltimore blames the Colts owner even though it was his father that moved the team to Indianapolis. In additon, these fans are not troubled by their double standard in taking the Cleveland Browns from their fans and turning them into the Ravens.

Yes, this is a long blog. Probably too long. I promise to have some shorties the rest of the week. In case you can’t take the time… well here’s our pic o’ day.

nope

Now, the story of the Colts to Indianapolis as compiled by Brian Casserly from sources including Wikipedia, and then placed on Stampede Blue as a fan post.

Back in 1969,  Baltimore’s Memorial Stadium originally built in 1922, had grown old and was considered inadequate by both the Colts and Orioles ownership. In spite of this, in May of that year, the city of Baltimore announced it would seek a “substantial” increase in Memorial Stadium rental fees from then Colts owner Carroll Rosenbloom. Rosenbloom himself had long since called Memorial Stadium “antiquated” and had threatened to move all Colts home games out of the stadium unless improvements were made. He even considered using $12–20 million of his own money to help fund the building of a new football only stadium on land in adjoining Baltimore County. 

Flash forward 3 years to November 1971, Rosenbloom announced that the team would not return to Memorial Stadium when their lease ran out following the 1972 season and that he was not interested in negotiating with the city anymore. He wanted out of Baltimore completely. A few of the reasons being – overall team revenue, conflicts with Baltimore Orioles ownership relating to Memorial Stadium’s use and the revenues it generated, a running feud with the local Baltimore press, and his new wife’s desire to move to the West Coast. Rosenbloom had decided to either move or sell the team. 

Real estate investor Will Keland was prepared to buy the Colts from Rosenbloom and the two had moved from small talk to serious negotiations. However, ultimately Keland could not generate enough funds necessary to purchase the team, but his golfing buddy Robert Irsay, (who originally was only slated to be an investor and own 1% of the franchise) did possess the necessary funds and decided to make the purchase himself. Under the terms of the arrangement, he bought the Los Angeles Rams for $19 million, and then traded them to Rosenbloom for the Colts and $3 million in cash on July 13, 1972. Irsay would now have to overcome the same obstacles that forced Rosenbloom to quit Baltimore. 

In 1971, Baltimore mayor William Donald Schaefer and the state’s governor, Marvin Mandel, created a stadium committee to examine the city’s stadium needs. The committee’s report was a blow to Memorial Stadium. Some of the problems mentioned: 10,000 stadium’s seats had views that were “less than desirable”; 20,000 seats were out-dated bench seats that had no back support; 7,000 so called seats were actually poorly constructed temporary bleachers that were installed for football games only. Also, there was not enough office space adequate enough for the front offices of either the Orioles or Colts, much less both teams combined. Both teams had to share locker rooms, the upper deck of Memorial Stadium did not circle the field, ending instead at the 50-yard line, thousands of potential seats (and added revenue) were missing. Any expansion plans for the stadium had usually mentioned less attractive (and less expensive) end-zone seats, not upper deck seating. And the number of bathroom facilities in Memorial Stadium was deemed inadequate. 

As a result, Maryland’s planners came up with an ambitious project that they nicknamed the Baltodome,[5] the project was to create a facility near the city’s Inner Harbor known as Camden Yards. The new stadium would host 70,000 fans for football games, 55,000 for baseball and 20,000 as an arena for hockey or basketball. For an estimated $78 million, the city and both professional franchise owners would be able to build a facility that would have kept everyone happy. Unfortunately the proposal did not receive support from the State of Maryland’s elected legislature. And on February 27, 1974 Maryland’s Governor Mandel pulled the plug on the idea.

 

In response Orioles owner Jerold Hoffberger was blunt: “I will bow to the will of the people. They have told us what they want to tell us. First, they don’t want a new park and second, they don’t want a club.”

Robert Irsay on the other hand was willing to wait: “It’s not a matter of saying that there will be no stadium. It’s a matter of getting the facts together so everybody is happy when they build the stadium. I’m a patient man. I think the people of Baltimore are going to see those new stadiums in New Orleans and Seattle opening in a year or two around the country, and they are going to realize they need a stadium … for conventions and other things besides football.” 

But Hyman Pressman, Baltimore’s City Comptroller, was against using any taxpayer funds to build a new stadium for the Colts or the Orioles. And during the 1974 elections, Pressman had an amendment to the city’s charter placed on the upcoming ballot. The amendment was known as “Question P”[3] and it called for declaring “Memorial stadium (then called the 33rd Street stadium) as a memorial to war veterans and prohibited use of city funds for construction of any other stadium. ” The measure was passed by the citizens of Baltimore by a margin of 56% to 44%. 

I believe that if you reverse-engineer the entire process back and look for turning points, the franchise’s move to Indianapolis was ultimately a result of Pressman’s actions and the subsequent vote by the citizens of Baltimore. 

In 1979, Indianapolis politicians, business & community leaders were united in their desire to attract major sporting events to central Indiana. And to facilitate this they created the Indiana Sports Corp. The next year, Mayor William Hudnut appointed a committee to study the feasibility of building a new stadium that could serve as home to a professional football team. That study proved positive and in 1982 construction of the stadium (Hoosier Dome) began. 

On December 18, 1983, The Colts played what was to become their final home game in the city of Baltimore. 27,934 fans showed up at Memorial Stadium, 516 more fans than attended the team’s first home game in 1947. And by February 1983 the relationship between Irsay and the politicians in Baltimore had deteriorated significantly.

That year Baltimore Mayor Schaefer asked the Maryland General Assembly to approve a paltry $15 million for renovation to Memorial Stadium. However, the Maryland legislature did not approve the request until the following spring, after the Colts’ lease had already expired[3] and only half of that $15 million would go towards improvements that the Colts were seeking (The other half for the Orioles).

 

Then in January 1984, Baltimore’s mayor Schaefer put it bluntly: “We’re not going to build a new stadium. We do not have the bonding capacity. We don’t have the voters or taxpayer who can support a $60 million stadium. One-third of the people in Baltimore pay taxes. Unless private enterprise builds it, we won’t build it. (This appears to have been a ruse to pit the taxpayers of Baltimore against Irsay because Schaefer well knew that the city could not legally use taxpayer money to build any new stadium as a result of the aforementioned question P). 

Irsay held discussions with several cities hungry for an NFL franchise (New York, Phoenix, Indianapolis, Birmingham, Jacksonville and Memphis[11]) eventually narrowing the list of cities to two, Phoenix and Indianapolis.[12] The Phoenix Metropolitan Sports Foundation, headed by real estate developer Eddie Lynch, along with Arizona Governor Bruce Babbitt and other top Arizona officials, had secretly met with Irsay early in January 1984.[10] And preliminary talks seemed promising. Phoenix was offering a below market rate $15,000,000.00 loan and rent free use of the 71,000 seat Sun Devil Stadium on the campus of Arizona State University. A second meeting was scheduled between Irsay and the Phoenix group. But when word of a second scheduled meeting leaked out and was reported in the local Baltimore press, Irsay canceled. 

Meanwhile in Indianapolis local leaders and real estate developer Robert Welch were lobbying the NFL to bring an expansion team to the city, with Welch as team owner. But NFL Commissioner Pete Rozelle announced that expansion had been put on hold. As a result of that announcement, Indiana Pacers owner Herb Simon contacted Colts’ officials on February 1st in order to take negotiations between the franchise and the city of Indianapolis to the next level. On February 13th Michael Chernoff, vice-president and general counsel of the Colts, responded by visiting Indianapolis as well as the Hoosier Dome and expressed an interest in the possibility of relocation.

Mayor Hudnut then assigned deputy mayor David Frick to begin negotiations with Michael Chernoff. The Colts and the Capital Improvement Board of Managers of Marion County, Indiana (“CIB”), the owner of the Hoosier Dome, began discussing the possibility of leasing the Dome to the Colts. Then on February 23rd Colts owner Robert Irsay visited.

 

“He [Irsay] was visibly moved,” former deputy mayor Dave Frick said commenting on Irsay’s reaction to entering the brand new domed stadium. “Emotionally, he was making the move.” 800px-RCA_Dome

Back in Baltimore, the situation continued to deteriorate. On February 24, 1984, a bill was introduced in the Maryland Senate authorizing Baltimore officials to condemn professional sports franchises for eminent domain purposes. On March 2nd, 1984, the NFL held a special meeting in Chicago. In a privileged executive session, with Irsay and other Colt personnel absent, the League decided that it would take no action with respect to any possible move of the Colts.

The League decided that the consideration of a Colts’ move would not be a League matter. Then Irsay was allowed to enter the meeting and he stated that he was considering relocation of the team to Indianapolis specifically, but was still negotiating with both Indianapolis and Baltimore officials. The League expressed neither approval nor disapproval of the possible move. NFL Commissioner Pete Rozelle later testified: “the effect [of this League position] was that Bob Irsay could move the Colts … to whatever city he chose,” without interference from the NFL. 

On March 26th the Maryland state Senate took up consideration of the bill authorizing Baltimore to condemn professional sports franchises. And a second bill where the state of Maryland would offer Colts Owner Robert Irsay $40 million in order to purchase the team and then sell it back to local Maryland investors. The first bill called for the state to condemn the Colts and begin eminent domain proceedings taking the team from Irsay outright (an idea first floated in a memo written by Baltimore mayoral aide Mark Wasserman). In what would later be an obvious error, the Maryland politicians chose the eminent domain route first and on March 27th the Maryland Senate passed emergency legislation which authorized the City of Baltimore to condemn the Colts franchise and related properties. 

Colts owner Robert Irsay said that the move to Indianapolis was “a direct result” of the eminent domain bill and[7] Colts counsel Michael Chernoff would say of the Senate vote:

 

“They not only threw down the gauntlet, but they put a gun to his head and cocked it and asked, ‘Want to see if it’s loaded?’ They forced him to make a decision that day.”

 

Citing the recent moves by the Maryland legislature, the Phoenix group withdrew their offer. Robert Irsay then called Indianapolis Mayor Hudnut in order to expedite negotiations. Indianapolis offered the Colts owner a $12,500,000 loan, a $4,000,000 training complex, and the use of the brand new $77.5 million, 57,980 seat Hoosier Dome.[14] Irsay agreed in principle and immediately instructed Chernoff to officially conclude the Hoosier Dome lease and the loan transaction with Indianapolis’ Merchants National Bank. In addition, he instructed Chernoff to move all the Colts’ property from Owings Mills, Maryland, to Indianapolis immediately. In turn Mayor Hudnut called his neighbor and friend, John B. Smith who was the chief executive officer of Mayflower Transit, an Indiana-based moving company, and Hudnut asked him for assistance.

That evening, Chernoff flew to Baltimore with an agent of Mayflower Transit to coordinate the move. Twenty-two Mayflower trucks along with Mayflower personnel arrived and they worked through the night of March 28-29 at the Colts’ Maryland training complex, loading most of the team’s physical possessions – including both office and athletic equipment. The obvious motivation for the overnight move was the realization that the following business day, the Maryland House of Delegates would also approve the eminent domain bill which if signed by the Maryland Governor, would result in Irsay losing ownership of his NFL franchise.

 

By 10:00 AM on the 29th the Colts franchise was completely gone from Baltimore.

 

That day the Maryland House of Delegates did indeed pass the Eminent Domain bill by a vote of 103-19 and the legislation taking control of the Colts was then sent to Maryland Governor Harry Hughes who signed it immediately.

 

Departing Maryland, each of the Mayflower trucks took a slightly different route on the way to Indianapolis in order to confuse the Maryland State Police, who could’ve been called on to put a stop to the move. Once each van was at the Indiana state line, it was met by Indiana State Police, who escorted each van to the Colts new home in Indianapolis.MAYFLOWER

Later that day the City of Baltimore officially served a letter upon the Colts at the team’s corporate headquarters in Skokie, Illinois, offering to purchase the team for $40 million. The offer, which terminated at noon the next day, was not responded to. That evening Baltimore’s Mayor Schaefer, appeared on the front page of the Baltimore Sun in tears.

 

After the Colts left and in spite of his earlier stance that the city of Baltimore would not build a new stadium,[6] the politician immediately prioritized the building of a brand new stadium. Putting it at the top of his legislative agenda.[7] On March 30th the Mayor and City Council of Baltimore enacted Emergency Ordinance No. 32, and immediately filed a condemnation petition in the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, attempting to acquire the Colts by eminent domain. Something the United States District Court would later rule was illegal. Later John Moag, Jr., chairman of the Maryland Stadium Authority, stated in sworn testimony before the U.S. Senate subcommittee responsible for the Fan Freedom and Community Protection Act:

 

“It was the failure of our local (Baltimore) and state elected officials in Maryland to provide the Colts with a firm proposal for a new stadium that led Mr. Irsay to accept an offer from Indianapolis to play in a new dome in that city.”

 

Indianapolis Mayor Hudnut held a press conference March 29 to announce an agreement had been reached and the team was on its way to Indianapolis. The deal was sealed March 30th with approval by the Capital Improvement Board, which operated the Hoosier Dome. Two days later, 20,000 new Colts fans cheered as Mayor Hudnut proclaimed March 29, 1984……”one of the greatest days in the history of this city.”

 

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