No matter where you are we will come to you

DO I HAVE A CASE?

Currently Viewing Posts Tagged American

Standing During the National Anthem

I am just going to start with one of those before-and-after pictures:

 

IMG_1561

I just wanted to insert that first picture, because I keep seeing “human” pictures like that on Facebook; and a dog picture really makes me smile.

Which leads me on to a more serious topic for the blog. What do you think about players not standing for the National Anthem? With the NFL season starting tonight, I am sure that we will see someone this weekend who decides not to stand. Honestly, it gets me kind of riled up. But I know there are those who disagree.

On that topic, here is what the Kansas City Chiefs owner has advised his organization:

IMG_1559

Now what do you think of that?

You won’t see this as an issue in the NBA. When the most recent collective bargaining agreement was entered into between the owners and the NBA players, it became a contract issue that all the players would stand for the National Anthem. So, not an issue in the NBA.

I suspect that during the next NFL negotiation, that this will become part of the negotiation. No longer a first amendment issue. Instead, a contract issue. However, it is worth noting some case law on the question of whether someone has the right not to stand.

Let’s turn to something similar. A failure to stand during the Pledge of Allegiance. In West Virginia State Board of Education v. Barnette (1943), the Supreme Court ruled that requiring students to stand for the Pledge of Allegiance in public schools violated the First and Fourteenth Amendments.

In public schools, the Supreme Court said that you could not make students stand. In the NFL, there is no rule requiring players to stand for the National Anthem. On the flip side, no one has said that employment law requires an owner to employ a player who will not stand. So, while the NFL has not come out with an official position, something like a statement from an owner like the Chiefs owner will have the following consequence… I bet no one sits during the Chiefs game.  What do you think?

And for pic o’ day, life is about being there for your friends. Right?

IMG_1560

Our Independence!

I was looking across the history books and saw that July 4 is a date with a lot of activity. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland was published. OK, maybe that doesn’t qualify as history. July 4th is the date that France offered the Statue of Liberty!

I find it quite ironic that July 4, 1826, is the day that both Thomas Jefferson and John Adams died. History has recorded some great back-and-forth between those two.

Jefferson died on that date at age 83. The night before, he knew death was close and gathered his family around his bed and uttered, “I have done for my country, and for all mankind, all that I could do, and I now resign my soul without fear, to my God, my daughter, to my country”.

That night, he woke at 8pm and asked his doctor whether it was yet the fourth. His doctor replied, “it soon will be”. Jefferson obviously placed great importance on July 4th and lived until one-o’clock in the afternoon the next day. He had made it!

As to Adams, his last words were “independence forever” and then he exclaimed that, “Thomas Jefferson survives”. Adams had also made it to that date that was so important to him and referenced his political opponent… not knowing that Jefferson had passed away a few hours earlier.

July 4 was important to them just as it is important to us. An acknowledgement of our independence.

This is my last blog until Monday. I hope you have a wonderful weekend and a special July 4th.

God bless America!

IMG_0145

 

Charles Whittlesey: What Happened?

     Wednesday’s Our Daily Bread , with a look toward Labor Day, briefly recited the story of Charles Whittlesey.

      Whittle

      Whittlesey initially graduated from law school and joined a law firm partnership. However, he felt a duty to join the military when the United States entered World War I. He left his partnership and shipped to France as a captain.

     At one point, he and his battalion were behind enemy lines as he commanded 554 soldiers. They were cut off from supplies. At one point, his unit was dubbed the “Lost Battalion” because all contact with the U.S. Army had been lost.

     On October 7, 1918, the Germans sent a blindfolded American prisoner of war carrying a white flag toward the battalion. He was carrying a letter that said the following:

 “The suffering of your wounded men can be heard over here in the German lines, and we are appealing to your humane sentiments to stop. A white flag shown by one of your men will tell us that you agree with these conditions. Please treat Private Lowell R. Hollingshead [the bearer] as an honorable man. He is quite a soldier. We envy you. The German commanding officer.”

     Whittlesey would not allow his men to surrender. Instead, he ordered that the white sheets that had been placed as signals to the Allied troops be removed, just in case the Germans would think that they were surrendering. That night, a relief force arrived and rescued the Battalion. Whittlesey received a battlefield promotion to lieutenant-colonel and ultimately received three medals of honor.

     He was considered a war hero of heroes. .

     His Wikipedia story summarizes the ending of his life with the following:

In November 1921, Whittlesey acted as a pallbearer at the burial of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery, along with fellow Medal of Honor recipients Samuel Woodfill and Alvin York. A few days later he booked passage from New York to Havana aboard the SS Toloa, a United Fruit Company ship. On November 26, 1921, the first night out of New York, he dined with the captain and left the smoking room at 11:15 p.m. stating he was retiring for the evening, and it was noted by the captain that he was in good spirits. Whittlesey was never seen again. He was reported missing at 8:00 a.m. the following morning. He is presumed to have committed suicide by jumping overboard, although no one reported seeing him jump and Whittlesey’s body was never recovered. Before leaving New York, he prepared a will leaving his property to his mother. He also left a series of letters in his cabin addressed to relatives and friends. The letters were addressed to his parents, his brothers Elisha and Melzar, his uncle Granville Whittlesey, and to his friends George McMurtry, J. Bayard Pruyn, Robert Forsyth Little and Herman Livingston, Jr. Also in his cabin was found a note to the captain of the Toloa leaving instructions for the disposition of the baggage left in his stateroom. He left the famous German letter asking for surrender to McMurtry.

     This life story of this hero is fitting as a remembrance, as we head into Labor Day. As Our Daily Bread referenced, Charles Whittlesey was publicly strong. Because he took his life, inwardly he must have been dealing with such emotions of despair.

     Maybe it’s a good reminder to us that just because someone says that everything is great, doesn’t mean that “everything is great”. That they sure could use a word of encouragement. Also, that those returning from the battlefield many times need more than a welcome home.     

 

     I hope you have a great weekend. Back on Tuesday. 

     And for pic o’ day, I felt the need to go a bit on the light side… in changing places:

changing places

  • Archives

  • Menu Title