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Those Personality Tests

In ninth grade, a book circulated through our class called Spirit-Controlled Temperament by author Tim LaHaye. (Amazon) It encouraged readers to identify the personalities and do a self-evaluation.

It caused a bunch of us as ninth-graders, to talk about personality traits instead of whether the Orioles had won or who was starting for the Colts. A pretty amazing feat.

The reason it was able to do that is because we all are interested in understanding ourselves. I remember after reading that book, I became a little concerned that I couldn’t decide which personality that I was supposed to be. It seemed like I fit in all the categories… seriously.

I later read criticism about the book’s attempt in categorizing everyone into 4 types of personalities. Probably a little to intense for me in ninth grade.

There is a test called the Myers-Briggs Personality Indicator (MBPT) which some firms use relating to employment.  It also helps individuals to identify job skills that they might use in looking for employment. It divides the test results into the following:

     E (extravert) or I (introvert), in interacting with others

  • S (sensor) or N (intuitive), in processing information
  • T (thinker) or F (feeler), in making decisions
  • J (judger) or P (perceiver), in dealing with the outside world

A person probably knows that they like people and are extroverted. This testing is to indicate that they might thrive in team building tasks. The extrovert probably shouldn’t try to take a job alone on some Alaskan science station.

Part of our interviewing process includes testing for job candidates. There are no right or wrong answers but the testing does attempt to quantify energy, focus and current stress levels; and whether someone is willing to work under supervision and within a team.

When I speak to the attorney candidates about the testing, without fail they ask me, “How did I do?”. I like it that it matters to them.

That brings me to the opposite spectrum. Our firm represents several clients who have suffered brain injury from a crash or even from getting slammed in the head with an airbag. It might have saved their life on impact but airbags can sure jerk your head back when they pop out of the steering wheel.

Some of our clients are diagnosed with mild traumatic brain injuries. That doesn’t mean that the injury is not serious, but it generally has more to do with the how long they were unconscious or  whether they were in a coma, to be categorized differently. The National Football League has also been responsible in part for helping the public understand the significance of a concussion.

The practical side of that is that many brain-injured clients are greatly fatigued, suffer personality changes or lose interest in things that meant a great deal to them before the crash. Ultimately, I have noticed that these clients don’t call and ask “How did I do?”. Unfortunately, part of the damages in these cases involves a loss of self.

If a person breaks their arm, doctors can put a cast on the arm. The sad part in a brain injury is that there is no cast that can repair a brain injury.

And for pic o’ day… here’s some real concern!!!!

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