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Some Football Safety

Is it hard to come back to work after a long weekend? Here’s a good starter!

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It’s football season, so here’s a picture from a this past Friday night’s high school football in Pickens, South Carolina. The shortest distance between two points is a straight line?

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Which brings us to our next football story. Sept 5 is an important football anniversary day. On this day in 1906  the first college legal forward pass was thrown by Bradbury Robinson of St. Louis University.(Smithsonian.com) Before that time, throwing a football beyond the line of scrimmage was against the rules and the idea of throwing a forward pass was even frowned upon. Not real football!

But in 1905,  football was growing more popular, even with pro football still more than a decade away. But it was also recognized as becoming increasingly violent. That year alone, there were 18 football related deaths nationwide, including three college players. The others were high-school players.

Then President Theodore Roosevelt, whose son was on the Harvard University freshmen football, made it clear he wanted safety reforms in the face of a possibility that college football was going to be abolished. In a commencement address that he gave at Harvard earlier in the year, Roosevelt mentioned the violence of football by saying that, “Brutality in playing a game should awaken the heartiest and most plainly shown contempt for the player guilty of it.

So, despite the fact that initially the forward pass was frowned upon as not being real football… safety was the guiding factor in offering this innovative concept of throwing the ball down the field. Historians argue a bit on who was the first to throw a football past the line of scrimmage in any organized game of football, but no one argues that safety is fun!!!!

And how about some beaver humor for pic o’ day?

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