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The $20 Bill

I love good strategy. For instance, here is the story of a fake city, to avoid being bombed by Germany.

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What do you know about the man on the $20 bill? The symposium that I wrote about in yesterday’s blog, Newt Gingrich compared Donald Trump to Andrew Jackson. So, I had to admit to myself that I did not know much about Andrew Jackson. Then I learned about the strategy that he used to become president… which ultimately led to his picture on our $20 bill.

His parents emigrated from Ireland and settled between North Carolina and South Carolina. Today, both states claim to be his birthplace.

Andrew Jackson was nicknamed “Old Hickory“. He picked up that nickname from the troops that he led during the War of 1812 because he was considered tough as “old hickory”, which is considered to be the wood preferred for axe handles because of his toughness. So, during his presidential campaign, his supporters decided to use that nickname for his campaign.

Speaking of strategy, it’s probably worthwhile to have have some backbone. But maybe Jackson took it a little too far. Supposedly he participated in many duels. Estimated number ranges from 5-100. (Quite an estimate) Charles Dickinson called Jackson “a worthless scoundrel, a paltroon and a coward” in a local newspaper. So… they had a duel to settle it. (Are you still wondering what a paltroon is? So am I! Just looked it up. It means coward. I wonder how you can be a paltroon and a coward. That seems repetitive and redundant)

Back to back they faced each other. (Yes… I took a little literary license there) At the signal, Dickson turned and fired first and hit Jackson in the chest. (More strategy to let his opponent fire first) The bullet barely missed Jackson’s heart by less than an inch. Despite the bullet in the chest, Jackson measured his shot and fired. Dickinson dropped dead. Meanwhile, Jackson carried that bullet in his chest for the rest of his life.

Here’s the one final thought on Jackson and the $20 bill. It’s truly curious that we carry that picture in our wallets or pockets. (assuming you are fortunate to have a $20 bill right now) Jackson detested paper money because he took a huge financial hit when paper notes were devalued . He only trusted gold and silver. He felt banks had the ability to manipulate money. And so it goes… his fame on paper still remains.

And finally, this has nothing to do with strategy. Our pic o’ day falls under the heading of nonsense.

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